archive-us.com » US » A » AGRIVISION.US

Total: 48

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Dig deep into data to get more yield
    Current and historic data analysis of his and other growers data in Bob s advisor s 100 000 acres of multi year group data database showed a consistent 15 bushel per acre penalty 185 vs 170 for planting early maturities over the past five years The advisor and the grower calculated he needed a 35 bushel premium to break even Bob s second question was whether the yield penalty was universal across all soil types His advisor added soil type to the relative maturity query and the results showed a 10 bushel disadvantage on the lighter soil types which was about 25 of the grower s operation The overall yields weren t as high on the lighter soil types which might be part of the reason as to why the penalty was lower Planting earlier maturities on lighter soil type fields dropped the breakeven premium to 23 bushel or offering a potential 30 acre advantage to planting early maturity corn and capturing the premium The advisor suggested they dig even deeper and look at planting date as well The advisor s instincts led to an even more powerful discovery The reward to earlier planting was 18 bushels acre more significant on the lighter soil types than the normal and heavier soil types 10 bushels acre This last discovery didn t make sense at first Like many growers Bob liked to plant his best fields first best being those with the highest yield potential Because the lighter soils had less yield potential they tended to be treated as the secondary ground But as Bob and his advisor considered what the data analysis was showing they realized that later planting dates meant pushing pollination back into the hotter and dryer weeks of summer The lighter soils didn t have as much water

    Original URL path: http://blog.agrivision.us/dig-deep-into-data-to-get-more-yield (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Get the Most Return From the Seed You Buy
    tuning a planter If you don t take time to repair and properly adjust the meters before hitting the fields it could cost you in lost yield potential The first step is to refer to the owner s manual regarding your planter s maintenance Even if you aren t calibrating the meters yourself it will be helpful to understand what s going on Be sure to have any graphite and seed treatment buildup that has accumulated on the inside working parts and surfaces including buffing away rust Key Takeaways A uniform stand is a necessity with rising input costs and high yielding genetics The cost of skips and uneven emergence could be huge in terms of lost corn yield potential It s worth having your planter seed meters checked repaired and properly calibrated Range of Meters There are several types of meters Be sure to maintain or replace any brushes belts idlers bearings or other parts for the best performance If you send your planter seed meters to someone else for testing and recalibrating you may want to send along some bags of the seed you are going plant as well Seed varies greatly from hybrid to hybrid so we suggest running your corn seed through your meters while during testing You want to aim for a 99 5 or higher singulation avoiding doubles or skips Also getting a uniform stand not only improves singulation it helps with spacing and seed to soil contact Replacement and or Repair Tips It s best to replace brushes every year Housings can warp from heat and use which may mean those need to be replaced regularly too Also important match each pneumatic disk with the meter it operated with the previous year If different disks and meters are mixed you may end up

    Original URL path: http://blog.agrivision.us/get-the-most-return-from-the-seed-you-buy (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Now You Can View Your Data In Real-Time
    all of the following JDLink AgLogic JD Parts John Deere Financial Stellar Support My Equipment Remote Display Access In addition to being able to access all of your important data in one location MyJohnDeere com allows you to share your information easily with your trusted partners These may include your John Deere dealer farm manager crop advisor banker or other third party individuals MyJohnDeere com will also become the new platform for John Deere products and services that will help you improve machine uptime logistics management and agronomic decisions You ll be able to access any new products and services as they become available through this single user friendly location I n summary MyJohnDeere com will streamline accessing your important information by allowing you to Manage equipment information production data and farm operations from a single website Centralized online portal to access view archive and manage business information Single sign on for multiple John Deere applications Access the website from a desktop computer or other internet enabled device Click here to visit the MyJohnDeere com portal Topics Tips for Utilizing Technology Equipment Optimization Industry Trends Current Agronomy News Deanne Myers do you not have online billpay Subscribe by Email Popular

    Original URL path: http://blog.agrivision.us/now-you-can-view-your-data-in-real-time (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • 10 Day Forecast Supports Good Corn Pollination
    barren ears and complete yield loss Even if pollination is successful entire ear shoots will usually die Leaves produce the necessary carbohydrates to complete kernel development Anatomy and Reproduction of the Tassel and Ear The tassel usually consists of approximately 1 000 branches along which many small male flowers two florets per branch are situated Each male flower contains three anthers The anther and it s attached filament comprise the stamen Each stamen releases a large number of pollen grains each of which contains the male sex cell When you do the math each individual tassel produces approximately 6 000 pollen bearing anthers give or take depending on the hybrid The ear is the female floral organ which develops at the tip of the shank the small stalk like structure that grows out from a leaf node located approximately midway between the ground and the tassel Occasionally a plant will produce an ear at several consecutive nodes but the one located uppermost on the stalk becomes the largest ear The immature ear consists of a cob eggs that develop into kernels after pollination and silks The kernels are arranged on the cob in pairs of rows From each egg a hair like structure called silk grows and eventually emerges from the tip of the husk Pollen shed usually begins in the middle of the central tassel spike and progresses outward in every direction over time Spent anthers will eventually drop from the tassel The yellowish or white dust like pollen represent the millions of individual pollen grains which range from 2 to 25 million produced per tassel Pollination occurs when pollen falls on the exposed silks Following pollination a male sex cell grows down each silk to a single egg and fertilization occurs The fertilized egg develops into a kernel

    Original URL path: http://blog.agrivision.us/10-day-forecast-supports-good-corn-pollination (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Recommendations to Improve Soybean Yield Potential
    of this is education from UNL research and extension faculty that planting soybeans earlier improves yield potential Soybean farmers listened and planted earlier Figure 1 Impact of soybean early and late planting date on grain yield at different on farm Nebraska locations 2008 2010 Fungicide and insecticide seed treatments were used for all plots Use the left vertical axis for yield and the right vertical axis for actual planting dates SCAL South Central Ag Lab Clay County Sew Seward County York York County Saun Saunders County The letter I in the x axis labels indicates the site was irrigated the letter R indicates rainfed Tillage varied by location and included no till as well as ridge tilled fields either 15 or 30 inch rows were used depending on the location Average yields were different yields from SCAL Rainfed 2009 were not included in the average Source Adapted from Table 1 Specht et al 2012 Recommendations Plant soybeans the last week in April in the southern two thirds of Nebraska and the first week in May in the northern third of the state if soil conditions are suitable and the weather forecast is conducive Use good judgment Soil temperature is less of a factor when following these guidelines than calendar date and soil moisture Regardless of calendar date neither mudding in soybeans that is planting when soils are too wet nor planting in dry soils will turn out well Treat early planted soybean with insecticide and fungicide seed treatments These mitigate potential problems from BLB as well as fungal organisms impacting germination and hypocotyl elongation If soil temperatures are greater than 50 F and the short term forecast is for warm conditions insecticide and fungicide seed treatments may not be necessary If corn planting is delayed into late April or early

    Original URL path: http://blog.agrivision.us/recommendations-to-improve-soybean-yield-potential (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Farm Data Management Agreement Reached
    the farmer to agree upon data use and sharing with the other stakeholders with an economic interest such as the tenant landowner cooperative owner of the precision agriculture system hardware and or ATP etc The farmer contracting with the ATP is responsible for ensuring that only the data they own or have permission to use is included in the account with the ATP Collection Access and Control An ATP s collection access and use of farm data should be granted only with the affirmative and explicit consent of the farmer This will be by contract agreements whether signed or digital Notice Farmers must be notified that their data is being collected and about how the farm data will be disclosed and used This notice must be provided in an easily located and readily accessible format Third party access and use Farmers and ranchers also need to know who if anyone will have access to their data beyond the primary ATP and how they will use it Transparency and Consistency ATPs shall notify farmers about the purposes for which they collect and use farm data They should provide information about how farmers can contact the ATP with any inquiries or complaints the types of third parties to which they disclose the data and the choices the ATP offers for limiting its use and disclosure An ATP s principles policies and practices should be transparent and fully consistent with the terms and conditions in their legal contracts An ATP will not change the customer s contract without his or her agreement Choice ATPs should explain the effects and abilities of a farmer s decision to opt in opt out or disable the availability of services and features offered by the ATP If multiple options are offered farmers should be able to choose

    Original URL path: http://blog.agrivision.us/farm-data-management-agreement-reached (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • "Grid" Iron
    for years now We have yield maps and soil samples and sometimes the grower instinctively knows where crops grow best and worst Put the talent or inputs where they will be most effective those top performing areas of the field That s the offense From the defensive perspective history can show us where the lower yielding areas are due to factors such as lighter drought prone soils excessive moisture or fertility issues that need to be addressed With the proper research done ahead of time the coach can call all plays with confidence Being accurate Just like the importance of having the right receiver in the exact spot on the field to catch a pass the more exact we are with our data the better We have the ability to layer yield maps year on year to show trends What we typically find is that poor producing areas of the field stay poor year after year and the standout areas continue to produce Those trends pop up in both wet and dry years We also know that the more precise we are with our soil sampling and yield information the better we re able to do with our play calling now that we have the technological ability to use our seed fertilizer and chemicals more precisely We can have a competitive advantage when utilizing proper placement of inputs on a field by field acre by acre zone by zone basis Decision making tool field by field grid by grid The growers who have already been using this technology are excited about the opportunity they have to put the data to work and make application decisions based on what they see The most progressive growers take this technology and make a connection all the way to the bank When we analyze

    Original URL path: http://blog.agrivision.us/grid-iron (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Fall Nitrogen Applications and Soil Temperature
    is leachable and subject to denitrification Figure 1 Simplified soil nitrogen cycle Since nitrification is a microbial mediated process the rate is influenced by several factors that affect biological activity such as ammonia in soil water inhibits nitrification temperature soil aeration only occurs in aerobic soils soil pH range from 4 5 to 10 0 optimum at pH 8 5 and soil moisture highest at field capacity but the largest influence is soil temperature For that reason a way to slow conversion of ammonium to nitrate is to have cold soil temperatures example of soil temperature effect on nitrification shown in Figure 2 The optimum temperature for nitrification is around 90 F Below 50 F the rate slows rapidly but nitrification continues until 32 F Soil temperature cannot be controlled but because soils cool in the late fall then nitrification of late fall applications will be reduced The later one waits to apply the better soils with colder temperatures mean less nitrification and a greater probability that soil temperature will not rebound to warm levels Figure 2 Effect of soil temperature on nitrate formation Adapted from Frederick L R and F E Broadbent 1966 Biological interactions p 198 212 In M H McVicker et al ed Agricultural anhydrous ammonia technology and use ASA Madison WI Nitrification inhibitors slow the conversion of ammonium to nitrate If more ammonium remains in soil during wet springtime periods then less nitrate will be present and subject to loss Nitrification inhibitors are not foolproof They temporarily slow but do not stop nitrification and formation of nitrate They degrade in soil which lessens effectiveness over time Warm soils that speed nitrification also speed inhibitor breakdown which means lower effectiveness and faster nitrification reestablishment Also nitrification inhibitor impact on N loss is solely dependent on substantially more

    Original URL path: http://blog.agrivision.us/fall-nitrogen-applications-and-soil-temperature (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive