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    They had five known children She died before 1664 and he married Elizabeth Blackleach daughter of John Blackleach of Boston before 1665 They had four children including a daughter Elizabeth born in Hartford in 1665 He was a sergeant in the Hartford as early as 1666 John Stedman was a proprietor of Hartford Connecticut having acquired the original right of Richard Olmsted who removed to Norwalk Connecticut 1650 1652 He is listed as a freeman of Hartford in 1654 July 1 1651 first three parcels recorded in Secretary s records in name of Thomas Stedman but indexed to John Stedman which is correct a A parcel of 4 acres he bought of Zachariah Field June 19 1660 b Fifteen acres of woodland in the oxpasture bought Dec 15 1659 of Edward Stebbing June 24 1660 c Three acres of swamp east of Conn River June 21 1660 d Three acres in North Meadow April 18 1663 e Two acres in North Meadow bought of Thomas Bull f One acre bought of Robert Sanford Recorded May 31 1671 Feb 25 1666 witnessed document Hartford Book of Distribution pp 437 438 536 531 107 234 550 552 565 521 522 After 1666 John Stedman bought a house and house lot at New London from Benj Atwell perhaps removed there for a year or two He removed to Wethersfield Connecticut in 1670 In February 1671 he paid for 80 acres as finally laid out November 1674 On January 30 1672 the proprietors voted undivided lands on the west side of town bounds one and 1 2 mile in length John Stedman drew the 34th lot Stiles Ancient Wethersfield V1 301 He was admitted inhabitant Jan 30 1671 2 at which time he was the owner of land he purchased of John Cherry He was Lieut of the Hartford Company of Dragoons July 1675 a good officer Thomas Stedman of New London was a brother to John Stedman Charles Ellery Stedman quotes the following letter from John to his brother Thomas in his 1880 genealogy I assume the original may be in the Connecticut Historical Society Loving bro Thos my love to yourself and your little ones and to uncle Nichols to aunt and to the rest of my friends certifying you through God s mercy goodness has we are in reasonably good health Brother these are to get you to assist my son in selling or letting my house which I bought of Benj Atwill which you will do in that business I do finally bind myself to confirm ratify as witness my hand and seal this last day of October 1672 from Wethersfield Extracted out of the original under the hand of John senior This letter proves that John of Hartford and Thomas of New London were brothers It also talks about Uncle Nichols who is probably the William Nicholls who is a stepfather of Hannah Isbell the wife of Thomas On November 6 1672 the New London property was sold to

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    by Athens co Board of Commissioners to Alexander Stedman two days attendance as judge of the court of common pleas November term 6 1806 Alex Stedman signed Audit report for county 1807 to 1812 associate Judge County Court of Common Pleas 1814 Alexander died Census Analysis 1790 Federal Census Tunbridge Orange Co VT p 35 04 04 04 00 00 Male 16 Alexander Stedman b 1746 Female Sarah Cushman b 1759 Male 16 Levi Stedman b 1771 Male 16 Levi Stedman b 1776 Male 16 Alexander Stedman b 1775 d 1791 Female Beulah Stedman II b 1775 Male Female Tryphena Stedman b 1779 Male Male Female Abigail Stedman b 1787 Male Missing Sarah Stedman II b 1770 m Frederick Hazen 1788 Amelia Stedman b 1790 1 1800 Federal Census Tunbridge Orange Co VT p 598 21201 11101 00 Male 45 Alexander Stedman b 1746 Female 45 Sarah Cushman b 1759 Male 16 26 Levi Stedman b 1776 Female 16 26 Tryphena Stedman b 1779 Male 16 26 Abial Stedman b 1781 Male 10 16 Abel C Stedman b 1785 Female 10 16 Abigail Stedman b 1787 Male Female Male Missing Alexander Stedman b 1775 died 1791 Beulah Stedman II b 1775 m E Cummings Levi Stedman b 1771 m Dorothy Cowdery and went to Ohio before 1800 She is listed in Tunbridge Eli Stedman b 1777 m Mary Gates 1798 and listed separately Note Lyman Stedman b 1798 is listed as a s o Levi Person ID I1329 Stedman Steadman Steedman Families of the New World Last Modified 6 May 2010 Father Joseph Stedman Jr b 1 Jan 1714 15 Lebanon New London Co CT d 23 Sep 1758 Hartford Hartford Co CT Age 43 years Mother Abigail Rockwell b Aug 1713 d 1773 Age 59 years Married Bef 1740 Family ID F710 Group Sheet Family 1 Sarah Cushman b 6 Jan 1748 49 Plymouth Plymouth Co MA d 22 Aug 1802 Athens Athens Co OH Age 53 years Married 10 Nov 1768 Coventry Tolland Co CT There were more children Children 1 Henry Stedman b Between 1755 and 1765 d 10 Jun 1818 Age 63 years 2 Sarah Stedman b 1769 d 1769 Age 0 years 3 Sarah Stedman II b 15 Feb 1770 Tunbridge Orange Co VT d 21 Aug 1815 Age 45 years 4 Judge Levi Stedman b 19 Sep 1771 Tunbridge Orange Co VT d 29 Jan 1823 Age 51 years 5 Beulah Stedman b 1 May 1773 Tunbridge Orange Co VT d 8 Sep 1774 Tunbridge Orange Co VT Age 1 years 6 Alexander Stedman b 15 May 1775 Tunbridge Orange Co VT d 9 Dec 1791 Tunbridge Orange Co VT Age 16 years 7 Beulah Stedman II b 15 May 1775 d Unknown 8 Levi Stedman b 19 Sep 1776 Tunbridge Orange Co VT d Unknown 9 Rev Eli Stedman b 17 Aug 1777 Tunbridge Orange Co VT d 28 May 1845 Rutland Meigs Co OH Age 67 years 10 Tryphena Stedman b 9

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    1706 This could be Mary s mother taking care of her step grandchildren John Stedman died in 1713 The New London Probate Record under date March 31 1713 has this notation Ages of John Stedman s children Hannah 16 Jane 14 Thomas 12 John 9 Ann 6 Nathan 4 Mary 2 Person ID I605 Stedman Steadman Steedman Families of the New World Last Modified 10 May 2010 Father Thomas Stedman b Bef 1625 UK d Abt 1676 New London New London Co CT Age 51 years Mother Hannah Isbell b 15 Mar 1643 44 Salem Essex Co MA d Mar 1707 08 New London New London Co CT Age 64 years Married 6 Aug 1668 New London New London Co CT New London New London Co CT 1646 1854 Vital Records from Barbour A Transcribed by Coralynn Brown ISBELL Hannah dau Eleazer Eliza b Mar 15 1673 Hannah dau Robert dec d m Thomas STEDMAN who had by his 2d wife a son John b Dec 25 1669 and a dau Ann b June 1668 Testified to by Mrs Elizabeth Trueman Mrs Susannah Fox Mar 4 1708 09 Robert sometime of New London died leaving 2 children Eleazer Hannah Testified to by Mrs Elizabeth Trueman Mrs Suannah Fox Mar 4 1709 09 Alt Marriage 8 Aug 1668 New London New London Co CT Family ID F138 Group Sheet Family 1 Jane Foster b Bef 5 Oct 1670 New London New London Co CT d Abt 1705 New London New London Co CT Age 34 years Alt Marriage Bef 1690 New London New London Co CT Married 1695 New London New London Co CT Children 1 Hanna Stedman b Abt 1697 New London New London Co CT d Unknown 2 Jane Stedman b 1699 New London New London Co CT d

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    as demanded c further shewing that said petitioners have since said trial found new evidence c praying for a new trial in said action as per petition on file Resolved by this Assembly that said petitioners have the liberty of another trial in said action at the superior court to be held at New London within and for the county of New London on the fourth Tuesday of September next by way of review and that the cost from the beginning follow the said trial in September aforesaid Died Unknown Notes Subject STEDMAN John Stedman of New London Date Sat 08 Sep 2001 23 03 32 0400 To me one of the mysteries of the Stedman family has been John Stedman the brother of Thomas Stedman who went to South Kingstown RI in the 1720s I have seen various stories about what happened to this John Stedman I have a reference that he married a Frances Greavey and another where he married an Elizabeth Packer Others that he went to Pennsylvania I have also heard a story about a John Stedman who was a lawyer in New London and this was always mentioned in context of his father John Stedman s o Thomas Stedman and Hannah Isbell At the Connecticut Valley Historical Museum I found a book titled The Diary of Joshua Hempstead of New London Sept 1711 Nov 1758 1901 Joshua seems to have documented everything he did who he saw and what the weather was for every day for those 47 years The following items of interest to Stedman researchers were Sunday 15 March 1719 Ebe Fox Jane Stidman published p 86 This is referring to the marriage banns for Jane Stedman sister of John and Thomas They are recorded as having married a few weeks later Sunday 26 September 1725 Samuel Chapman Widow Stidman published p 161 After the death of Jane Foster John Stedman married Mary Beebe who were the parents of more children notably Nathan Alexander Stedman in 1709 John Stedman died in 1713 Samuel Chapman is the father of Thomas Chapman who married Mary s daughter and Nathan s sister Ann Stedman After Samuel s wife died he married Mary Beebe Stedman and this is the publishing of the banns for this At some point someone is going to need to track these Chapmans Friday 6 December 1728 He had ridden to Point Judith in what is now Washington Co RI the previous day I got to Robert Hassards by night to where was Stephn Thos Harris Jno Stidman had left there I stayed there p 205 This suggests that a John Stedman was in Port Judith Robert Hassard is likely Robert s o Stephen Hazard 1702 1751 who lived at Point Judith and was a politician and official in the colony Thursday 1 January 1729 30 I was at home al day writing Deed Bonds c T Stedman to Mary Darte p 216 Thursday 2 June 1744 I was in Court al day

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  • Family Trees
    22 Dec 1758 New London New London Co CT Person ID I36322 Stedman Steadman Steedman Families of the New World Last Modified 7 Jan 2006 Father Joshua Hempstead b 16 Jun 1649 New London New London Co CT d 16 Aug 1688 New London New London Co CT Age 39 years Mother Elizabeth Larrabee b 23 Jan 1651 52 Old Saybrook Middlesex Co CT d 4 Dec 1727 New London

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    23 M W Coal Miner Ohio citizen Nettie 18 F W Ohio School Mary 14 F W Ohio Colter Mary 14 F W Ohio 1880 Census 1880 Center Point Clay Co IN Center Point Corporation Sugar Ridge Twp Clay Co IN ED 237 p 17 527A National Archives Film T9 0270 Relation Sex Marr Race Age Birthplace John T STEADMAN Self M M W 69 CT Occ Coal Miner Fa CT Mo MA Susan F STEADMAN Wife F M W 28 OH Occ Housekeeping Fa OH Mo OH William STEADMAN Son M S W 8 IN Occ At Home Fa OH Mo OH Adda STEADMAN Dau F S W 1 IN Fa CT Mo OH Died 9 Sep 1893 Cloverland Clay Co IN Person ID I23791 Stedman Steadman Steedman Families of the New World Last Modified 23 Nov 2011 Father David Stedman b Between 1777 and 1778 CT d Aft 1833 OH Age 57 years Mother Rachel b 1788 Hartford Hartford Co CT d 11 Apr 1848 Age 60 years Family ID F9664 Group Sheet Family 1 Eliza Ann Phillips b 23 Apr 1814 VA d 25 Aug 1872 Center Point Clay Co IN Age 58 years Married 11 Sep 1832 Muskingum Co OH Children 1 William Henry Stedman b 5 Oct 1833 Zanesville Muskingum Co OH d 23 Oct 1924 Cloverland Clay Co IN Age 91 years 2 Charles E Stedman b Abt Apr 1836 OH d Unknown 3 Harriet Ann Stedman b 23 Jun 1838 d 11 Nov 1849 Zanesville Muskingum Co OH Age 11 years 4 Margaret Jane Stedman b Abt 1844 OH d Unknown 5 George T Stedman b Abt 1846 OH d Unknown Center Point Clay Co IN 6 Eliza Ellen Stedman b 14 Jan 1849 OH d 1 Mar 1860 Zanesville Muskingum Co OH

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    NC Regiment served with Lee s army during the entire war and was wounded three times returned to Chatham County and taught school one year studied law was admitted to the bar in 1865 and commenced practice in Wilmington NC in 1867 delegate to the Democratic National Convention at Cincinnati in 1880 which nominated Winfield S Hancock of PA for President and William H English of Indiana for Vice President Lieutenant Governor of North Carolina 1884 1888 moved to Greensboro NC in 1898 president of the North Carolina Bar Association in 1900 and 1910 director of the North Carolina Railroad in 1909 and 1910 during which time he served as president trustee of the University of North Carolina 1899 1915 director of Guilford Battle Ground Co 1898 1917 elected as a Democrat to the Sixty second and to the nine succeeding Congresses and served from March 4 1911 until his death was not a candidate for renomination died at Mount Alto Veteran s Hospital Washington D C September 23 1930 interment in Cross Creek Cemetery Fayetteville NC 5 The University of North Carolina Alumni History 1775 1924 AB Degree 1861 AM Degree 1866 Congressional Biography STEDMAN Charles Manly a Representative from North Carolina born in Pittsboro Chatham County N C January 29 1841 moved with his parents to Fayetteville N C in 1853 attended Pittsboro Academy and Donaldson Academy at Fayetteville was graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1861 during the Civil War served as a private in the Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry Company First North Carolina Regiment and later as major in the Forty fourth North Carolina Regiment returned to Chatham County and taught school at Pittsboro one year studied law was admitted to the bar in 1865 and commenced practice in Wilmington N C in 1867 delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1880 Lieutenant Governor of North Carolina 1884 1888 unsuccessful candidate for nomination as Governor in 1888 and again in 1903 moved to Asheville N C in 1891 to Greensboro N C in 1898 and continued the practice of law president of the North Carolina Bar Association in 1900 and 1901 director of the North Carolina Railroad in 1909 and 1910 during which time he served as president trustee of the University of North Carolina 1899 1915 elected as a Democrat to the Sixty second and to the nine succeeding Congresses and served from March 4 1911 until his death in Washington D C September 23 1930 interment in Cross Creek Cemetery Fayetteville N C In the Dictionary of North Carolina Biography edited by William S Powell copyright 1994 University of North Carolina Press in the collection of the Presbyterian Church USA Department of History Montreat Call No CT 252 D5 at page 431 of Volume 5 we find a biography of Charles Manley Steadman which reads as follows Stedman Charles Manly 29 Jan 1841 23 Sept 1930 Confederate officer lawyer and congressman was born in Pittsboro the son of Nathan

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    Niagara River or Escarpment Their total weight was about 60 tons The mortar to hold them together was made using lime from Lewiston The first floor of the barracks contained a messroom and kitchen Sleeping quarters for the garrison of the fort was on the upper floor Chabert made the portage profitable for his government the Native Americans and himself He introduced horses and vehicles to the area making it much easier to carry canoes and goods In the first week of July 1759 with British forces approaching from the west along the south shore of Lake Ontario the men in the barracks must have discussed their possible fate while preparing their last meals by the stone chimney If only those stones could talk On July 8 Chabert and his men couldn t wait any longer Setting fire to the fort the barracks and the sawmill by the American Rapids they fled to Fort Niagara All that remained of their occupation above the falls was the stone chimney In 1760 the British built Fort Schlosser a little east of the site of Fort Little Niagara Using the partially completed French chapel from Fort Niagara they erected a two story house with a one and one half story addition attached to the French stone chimney All of the walls of the house were made of clapboard and had coops holes through which muskets could be fired From 1760 to 1761 a trader named Duncan lived in the house In charge of running the portage he was thrown out of the house and lost his job because he lost favor with General Thomas Gage John Stedman got Duncan s job and moved into the house in 1761 Despite protests from the Senecas he cleared a lot of land by the house to plant a large apple orchard He also made a clearing on the upper end of Goat Island for his livestock to protect them from marauding packs of wolves He gave Goat Island its name after one of his goats that survived a terrible winter there John actually called it The Goat s Island In the summer of 1763 he improved the portage road around the falls and gorge so that larger wagons could use it On Sept 14 his wagon train was ambushed by a large party of young Seneca warriors at the Devil s Hole He was able to escape even though his attackers tried very hard to kill him In 1764 the British took the land on both sides of the Niagara River from the Senecas Stedman could then run the portage without fear He entertained many people in his house Many fine meals were prepared by the stone chimney Stedman moved to the Canadian side of the Niagara River after the end of the American Revolution and helped to create a portage there in 1790 His American friend Jesse Ware lived in the house from 1797 to 1804 Stedman and some of his descendants tried to get the house and property around it back for a number of years but failed In 1805 New York State leased the house and land to Porter Barton and Co Augustus Porter and Benjamin Barton also were able to get the rights to the American portage Augustus and his family moved into Stedman s house in 1806 They stayed there until the completion in 1808 of a new brick house just above the American Rapids From 1809 to 1812 Enos Broughton leased Stedman s house and converted it into a popular tavern It became the center of many important local activities During the War of 1812 American troops occupied the house They also made use of Fort Schlosser On July 4 1813 British troops crossed the Niagara River and were able to capture the house but only stayed there about 6 hours fearing the arrival of American reinforcements Fort Schlosser and Stedman s house were burned by the British in December 1813 in retaliation for the burning of Newark now Niagara on the Lake earlier in the month by American forces Once again the old stone chimney survived an attempt to destroy it Like a lone sentinel it stood by the charred ruins of a house and fort In 1818 or 1819 a local justice and town clerk Epaphroditus Emmons built a slight temporary two story wooden building around the chimney He used it as an inn for three or four years when he took it down and reassembled it at another place In 1840 General Peter B Porter built a frame house with a one story addition attached to the stone chimney He also sealed the second story fireplace with similar dolostone stones In 1876 Peter A Porter gained possession of the house and tore it down in 1889 In 1890 the Niagara Falls Power Co bought the property around the chimney This caused many people to express concern for the historic chimney In 1891 local resident Thomas V Welch one of the people responsible for the creation of Niagara Reservation State Park by the falls wrote the words to a song about the chimney in order to draw attention to the need to save it According to the song Long may the old stone chimney stand Upon Niagara s shore The sons of France and Britain s band They battle there no more The pioneers and sweethearts dear Are sleepin on the hill Where the stone chimney stands In the evening gray and still As a result of the great respect for it the chimney was very carefully dismantled and moved about 150 feet in 1902 This placed it away from the nearby industrial developments at least for awhile The need to expand industries for the war effort made it necessary to move the chimney again in 1942 This time it was taken much farther west to Porter Park There it stands today embedded in an embankment by the Robert Moses Parkway and unnoticed by nearly all tourists and residents A veritable who s who of famous people visited the buildings attached to the old stone chimney Among them Pierre Pouchot commandant of Fort Niagara during the French and Indian War Sir William Johnson superintendent of Indian Affairs for New York for England during the 18th century Israel Putnam Old Put American Revolutionary War hero George Clinton New York s first governor Joseph Brant the Mohawk leader who led attacks against American settlements during the American Revolution General John Graves Simcoe the first governor general of Upper Canada General Sir Isaac Brock the great Canadian hero of the War of 1812 De Witt Clinton the governor of New York who built the Erie Canal Red Jacket the Seneca orator and leader who played an important role in both the American Revolution and the War of 1812 the Marquis de LaFayette the French general who led American and Native American forces during the American Revolution General Winfield Scott a great American hero of the War of 1812 Thomas Moore the Irish poet and composer who wrote much about the Falls of Niagara in the early part of the l9th century The Old Stone Chimney must be preserved and placed in a more suitable location a site befitting the second oldest masonry structure in New York State west of the Hudson River Better yet it should also be attached to a replica of one of the buildings once around it That should be John Stedman s house because more important events took place in it than in all the other buildings combined The reconstructed historic site could then be surrounded by related constructions Throughout the year reenactments would provide audiences with a taste of life by the Upper Landing of the Niagara portage In the 1920s and 30s many people rallied to save Old Fort Niagara from a terrible fate That was a very good cause The same thing must be done to save the Old Stone Chimney and its precious heritage The results of such action will be greatly rewarded culturally and economically Paul Gromosiak is a local historian and author of several books on the history of the area http www niagarafallsreporter com chimney html http womenshistory about com library etext bl nlmj17 htm A Narrative of the Life of Mrs Mary Jemison An example of the Indian Captivity Narrative written in 1823 by James E Seaver from interviews with Mary Jemison LIFE OF MARY JEMISON APPENDIX An account of the destruction of a part of the British Army by the Indians at a place called the Devil s Hole on the Niagara River in the year 1763 It is to be regretted that an event of so tragical a nature as the following should have escaped the pens of American Historians and have been suffered to slide down the current of time to the verge of oblivion without having been snatched almost from the vortex of forgetfulness and placed on the faithful page as a memorial of premeditated cruelties which in former times were practised upon the white people by the North American Savages Modern History perhaps cannot furnish a parallel so atrocious in design and execution as the one before us and it may be questioned even if the history of ancient times when men fought hand to hand and disgraced their nature by inventing engines of torture can more than produce its equal It will be observed in the preceding narrative that the affair at the Devil s Hole is said to have happened in November 1759 That Mrs Jemison arrived at Genesee about that time is rendered certain from a number of circumstances and that a battle was fought on the Niagara in Nov 1759 in which two prisoners and some oxen were taken and brought to Genesee as she has stated is altogether probable But it is equally certain that the event which is the subject of this article did not take place till the year 1763 In the time of the French war the neighborhood of Forts Niagara and Sclusser or Schlosser as it was formerly written on the Niagara river was a general battle ground and for this reason Mrs Jemison s memory ought not to be charged with treachery for not having been able to distinguish accurately after the lapse of sixty years between the circumstances of one engagement and those of another She resided on the Genesee at the time when the warriors of that tribe marched off to assist in laying the ambush at the Devil s Hole and no one will doubt her having heard them rehearse the story of the event of that nefarious campaign after they returned Chronology and history concur in stating that Fort Niagara was taken from the French by the British and that Gen Prideaux was killed on the 25th of July 1759 Having obtained from Mrs Jemison a kind of introduction to the story I concluded that if it yet remained possible to procure a correct account of the circumstances which led to and attended that transaction it would be highly gratifying to the American public I accordingly directed a letter to Mr Linus S Everett of Buffalo whose ministerial labor I well knew frequently called him to Lewiston requesting him to furnish me with a particular account of the destruction of the British at the time and place before mentioned He obligingly complied with my request and gave me the result of his inquiries on that subject in the following letter Copy of a letter from Mr Linus S Everett dated Fort Sclusser 29th December 1823 Respected and dear friend I hasten with much pleasure to comply with your request in regard to the affair at the Devil s Hole I have often wondered that no authentic account has ever been given of that bloody and tragical scene I have made all the inquiries that appear to be of any use and proceed to give you the result At this place Fort Sclusser an old gentleman now resides to whom I am indebted for the best account of the affair that can be easily obtained His name is Jesse Ware his age about 74 Although he was not a resident of this part of the country at the time of the event yet from his intimate acquaintance with one of the survivors he is able to give much information which otherwise could not be obtained The account that he gives is as follows In July 1759 the British under Sir William Johnston took possession of Forts Niagara and Sclusser which had before been in the hands of the French At this time the Seneca Indians which were a numerous and powerful nation were hostile to the British and warmly allied to the French These two posts viz Niagara and Sclusser were of great importance to the British on the account of affording the means of communication with the posts above or on the upper lakes In 1760 a contract was made between Sir William Johnston and a Mr Stedman to construct a portage road from Queenston landing to Fort Sclusser a distance of eight miles in order to facilitate the transportation of provision ammunition c from one place to the other In conformity to this agreement on the 20th of June 1763 Stedman had completed his road and appeared at Queenston Landing now Lewiston with twenty five portage wagons and one hundred horses and oxen to transport to Fort Sclusser the king s stores At this time Sir William Johnston was suspicious of the intentions of the Senecas for after the surrender of the forts by the French they had appeared uneasy and hostile In order to prevent the teams drivers and goods receiving injury he detached 300 troops to guard them across the portage The teams under this escort started from Queenston landing Stedman who had the charge of the whole was on horse back and rode between the troops and teams all the troops being in front On a small hill near the Devil s Hole at that time was a redoubt of twelve men which served as a kind of guard on ordinary occasions against the depredations of the savages On the arrival of the troops and teams at the Devil s Hole says a manuscript in the hands of my informant the sachems chiefs and warriors of the Seneca Indians sallied from the adjoining woods by thousands where they had been concealed for some time before for that nefarious purpose and falling upon the troops teams and drivers and the guard of twelve men before mentioned they killed all the men but three on the spot or by driving them together with the teams down the precipice which was about seventy or eighty feet The Indians seized Stedman s horse by the bridle while he was on him designing no doubt to make his sufferings more lasting than that of his companions but while the bloody scene was acting the attention of the Indian who held the horse of Stedman being arrested he cut the reins of his bridle clapped spurs to his horse and rode over the dead and dying into the adjacent woods without receiving injury from the enemy s firing Thus he escaped and besides him two others one a drummer who fell among the trees was caught by his drum strap and escaped unhurt the other one who fell down the precipice and broke his thigh but crawled to the landing or garrison down the river The following September the Indians gave Stedman a piece of land as a reward for his bravery With sentiments of respect I remain sir your sincere friend L S EVERETT Mr J E Seaver Pictorial Guide to the Falls of Niagara A Manual for Visiters Giving and Account of this Stupendous Natural Wonder and all The Objects of Curiosity in its Vicinity With Every Historical Incident of Interest and Also Full Directions for Visiting the Cataract and its Neighboring Scenes Illustrated by Numerous Maps Charts and Engravings From Original Surveys and Designs The Illustrations Designed and Engraved by J W Orr Buffalo Press of Salisbury and Clapp 1842 http www niagara edu library nfguides orr html See pp 224 228 Pioneer History of the Holland Purchase of Western New York Orsamus Turner 1850 Jewett Thomas Co Buffalo pp 227 230 Tragedy of the Devil s Hole There are few of our readers who will not be familiar with the main featurs of this event It was fresh in the recollection of the few of the white race that were found here when settlement commenced and Seneca Indians were then living who participated in it The theatre of this tragedy the locality that is figuratively designated as one of the fastnesses of the great embodiment of sin and evil was in the high banks of the Niagara river three miles below the Falls and half a mile below the Whirlpool It is a deep dark cove or chasm An air of sullen sublimity prevades its gloom and where in its shadowy depths you seem cut off from the world and confined in the prison house of terror To appearance it is a fit place for a demon dwelling and hence probably derives its name Orr s Guide to Niagara Falls The road along the river bank passes so near that the traveller can look down from it into the frightful gulf to the bottom of the abyss one hundred and fifty feet It would seem that a huge section of rock had been detached parting off and leaving the high banks almost perpendicular over hanging in fact at some points A small stream the Bloody Run taking its name from the event of which we are about to give some account pours over the high pallisade of rock Trees of the ordinary height of those common in our forests rise from the bottom of the Hole their tops

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